Review – Complexity

Review – Complexity

“…the performances were bold and intense, characterized by forceful accents and big dynamic contrasts. The faster and more impetuous movements were a little unkempt, as they should be in Beethoven: In the third movement of the “Serioso,” with its furious attacks and slashing accents, the players retained some individuality of expression, suggesting four friends engaged in earnest conversation. When a more unified sound was called for, as in the molto cantabile second movement of Op. 127, Camerata complied with a rich blend and gorgeous chordings.” Read more at incidentlight.com

Review – Conversation

Review – Conversation

“The week opened with an extraordinary season opener by Camerata San Antonio…Pianist Viktor Valkov joined Camerata string quartet regulars Matthew Zerweck (violin) and Ken Freudigman (cello) in music by Schumann, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. The performances were consistently taut, red-blooded, muscular and huge, the kind that grabs you by the throat and doesn’t let go till the end.”

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Review – Salon 2018

Review – Salon 2018

The splendid pianist Viktor Valkov joined Camerata’s core string quartet for the annual “Salon” concert of short, mostly light works, Jan. 28 in the University of the Incarnate Word concert hall.

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Review – Notorious HBG

Review – Notorious HBG

Would someone please round up the members of Camerata San Antonio, lock them up in a room, and not let them out until they’ve recorded the whole damn cycle of Beethoven’s 16 string quartets?

The notion first occurred to me in March of last year, when the foursome delivered a stunning account of the “Great Fugue” in its original context as the final movement of the Quartet in B-flat, Op. 130. Then the first of the three “Rasumovsky” Quartets (Op. 59,No. 1, in F) closed Camerata’s Feb. 18 concert at the University of the Incarnate Word, and the impression was confirmed. Feral and untethered, but also warm and sweet, and always in motion, this was among the most Beethovenian Beethoven performances in my experience, whether live or in recordings.

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